Enjoying mangoes when its season is done
It’s a dessert in itself, with its bold sweetness, subtle tart, and fruity notes.
Enjoying mangoes when its season is done

What is the ideal way to eat mangoes? In the Philippines where the best of this fruit is grown, it is most enjoyable on its own, to be quite frank. The bright yellow skin gives off a fresh, sweet fragrance that’s amplified once peeled. Sticky yellow juice trickles down your hand and mouth as you bite into that characteristic flavor. It’s a dessert in itself, with its bold sweetness, subtle tart, and fruity notes.

There are many varieties of mangoes in the Philippines, from the usual yellow, the summer favorite Indian mango, the crunchy apple mango, to the gargantuan horse mango. Each has its appeal, but the problem arrives when the season ends. Where then can we get our mango fix?

 

Fortunately, Filipinos love turning this fruit into something even more spectacular that can be enjoyed all year round. Here are some mango treats you can indulge in until the next summer comes around.

Auro 68% Dark Chocolate Covered Freeze Dried Mango

The mango and chocolate combination has become somewhat of a favorite among local chocolatiers, but Auro does it a bit differently. Using freeze-dried pieces of mango and coating it in rich dark chocolate, these are bite-sized snacks that play with creamy and crispy textures. What’s more, Auro relies on the natural sweetness of the mango and keeps the sugar content low. It’s gluten-free, too!

https://aurochocolate.com/

Farmacy Mango Sorbet

This ice cream and soda fountain in BGC is well-known for its promise to serve fresh and quality ice cream, shakes, and other treats. You can taste every bit of that commitment in this refreshing yet flavorful sorbet. Its frozen quality presents balance to the intense sweetness of mango, but what’s more impressive is how the texture feels more creamy than icy. It’s packed specially so you can taste that Farmacy experience anywhere.

https://wildflourtogo.com/

Deli by Chele Mango Basil Jam

Acclaimed chef Chele Gonzalez launched his online deli in the midst of the pandemic and we’re only happy beneficiaries of his goal to spread his skills to home kitchens everywhere. In this unique jam recipe, he amps the refreshing flavor of mango with the minty tinge of basil. Even more impressive is how this flavorful jam contains no artificial flavorings, color, or preservatives!

https://www.delibychele.com/

Manila Creamery Mango Float Parfait

Amid the numerous ice cream and gelato brands in the country, Manila Creamery sets itself apart by focusing on Filipino-inspired flavors. While this parfait may not seem outrightly local, the duo behind the company took inspiration from the mango float trend that took the Philippines by storm in 2018. While that craze has passed, this delicious concoction, using Filipino mangoes, of course, is here to stay.

https://manilacreamery.com/

Elias Astig Mango Hard Cider

You’ve likely had mango liqueurs and mango wines, maybe even mango beers, but have you had mango cider? Traditionally made using fermented apple juice, Elias crafts this one using a combo of sour apples and the sweetest Philippine mangoes. It’s an interesting and addictive combination that will have you shrugging off your old favorite drinks.

https://wickedelias.com/

 

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